11 Questions To Ask A Dog Boarding Facility (List of Veterinary Tips)

11 Questions To Ask A Dog Boarding Facility

Every dog owner knows the struggle of thinking of the best ways to make your dog comfortable.

 

Let’s say you’re travel out of town for business, and you can’t take your dog along with you.

 

The best option would be to get a trusted friend or family to help you look after your dog. But what happens when no one is available?

 

That’s why there are boarding facilities or pens being operated to help you in this situation.

 

Understandably, leaving your dog in a boarding facility might be difficult and nerve-racking for both you and your dog.

 

That’s why we compiled a list of important questions that you can ask the boarding facility to reassure you of whether or not they are a great fit for you and your dog.

 

11 Questions to ask any dog boarding facility

dog sitting on a couch

These are the questions that you can ask any dog kennel or biasing pens right before allowing your dog to live there. They are:

 

1. Are you licensed?

In both the UK and the United States, kennels have to be licensed for them to be able to establish their facilities.

 

So endeavor to ask them if they have obtained the suitable license that allows them to be able to operate.

 

2. Do you have insurance in case of any eventuality?

Kennels should have the necessary or basic insurance.

 

For example, insurance against theft, dog illnesses, accidents, and much more.

 

The insurance can help reassure you of their level of professionalism and their ability to think ahead.

 

3. Can I look around the entire site/facility?

You should get a feel of the place before getting your dog in.

 

Check out for feelings of sadness or despair from the other dogs.

 

Of course, look out for anything that might hint at the neglect or lack of proper sanitation and care, such as bad smells or odors.

 

 

 

 

4. What happens if there’s an emergency?

Hopefully, this never happens while you’re away.

 

But in the occurrence that an emergency, e.g., a health emergency, does happen, you should ask what the cause of action is in this instance.

 

And also ask them if they are going to call you when it happens.

 

It would also help if you can ascertain the possibility of your dog being transferred to her own personal vet if she falls sick.

 

5. How many staff members do you have working here?

You should ask about what the staff situation is like in the facility. Are they overworked? Are they effective at their job?

 

A great rule of thumb to ascertain if there are enough staff in the dog facility is to make sure that a staff member is assigned to ten dogs at a time.

 

That way, you can be certain that your dog will be getting enough care and attention while they’re there.

 

6. What kind of certification or training do these staff members have?

In an ideal situation, the staff members in charge of caring for the pets should have experience and some degree of training on the job.

 

7. Are there play areas available?

dog playing

Your dog needs to be getting as much exercise as possible.

 

So make sure to not only ask the question but also get to see it.

 

You should be checking it out to make sure it’s safe enough for your dog to play.

 

Inform the staff that you would want your dog to get enough time to play, socialize with other dogs and obey the call of nature if they have to.

 

8. What will my dog’s itinerary look like?

Question the kennel about what your dog’s itinerary will look like for the days you will be away.

 

Make sure they’re getting enough rest and exercise during their time in the Kennels.

 

And if possible, you can also make a few changes to the itinerary that satisfy you and your pup.

 

9. Do you have access to the phone number of an emergency vet?

It’s quite common for dogs to get sick while they’re at boarding facilities.

 

This is because of the close proximity they have to other dogs.

 

It’s essential to make sure the dogs boarding facility has access to the phone number of an emergency vet if an ailment escalates beyond their control.

 

10. What will my dog be eating?

You should know what your dog’s menu option would be like during their stay at the boarding facility and if it would be nutritious enough for your dog.

 

Inquiring when your dog will be eating can also help.

 

It’s important that your dog sticks to a specific routine during their stay at the lodging facilities.

 

If possible, you can also request a menu option of your own choosing.

 

This is important as a drastic change to your dog’s usual meal plan, or meal option can lead to illnesses.

 

11. What is the cost of everything?

Finally, you should ask for the full cost of everything.

 

If you do decide to onboard your dog in the facilities, then you should ask for a thorough breakdown of costs.

 

Everything from accommodation to feeding and sometimes even the cost of accessing playing areas.

 

Conclusion

Being away from your pet can be stressful for both of you, and having to remember and ask these many questions isn’t making things easier or lessening the burden.

 

However, by asking these questions and with proper investigation, you can be certain that your dog is in safe and professional hands.

 

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Russel

Russel

A pet owner who loves to share useful facts and information about animals. For now, I write mostly about dogs and cats.