What To Look For When Buying A Miniature Schnauzer Puppy?

What To Look For When Buying A Miniature Schnauzer Puppy?

Looking to buy or adopt a miniature schnauzer puppy soon?

 

Well asking the right questions and knowing what to look out for can be the difference between getting a mixed breed pup with unknown medical conditions or a pure breed with a full medical history.

 

To ask the right questions you have to first do your research.

 

Research to know what you want and what you would be getting into getting this puppy; also research the chosen breeders you wish to patronize.

 

What To Look Out For In Miniature Schnauzers?

Miniature Schnauzers puppy

Looking at the puppies should not be the first step but here is what you should notice in a miniature schnauzer puppy when you see one.

 

1. It should be with its litter and parents and should act normal with them, included but not necessarily playful.

 

It should be clean, confident, appear healthy with bright eyes and healthy fur.

 

 

2. Whichever miniature you settle on would have a puppy pack, and of the health certificates lookout for the Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) test results, Congenital Cataracts (CC) test results, and Hereditary Cataracts (HC) test results.

 

CC tests are done at about 6 – 8 weeks and a certificate is issued for the whole litter, the other tests are done at 1 year old but you can view certificates for the parents.

 

Ask The Breeder About References

This might be the best way to be able to tell the difference between a backyard breeder and a professional breeder.

 

Most professional breeders would have references from previous buyers or veterinarians they have worked with.

 

While there is no problem with backyard breeders who are non-professionals, they may not be able to answer all the questions you have, be able to keep up with all the necessary vaccinations, and even have time for your follow-up contacts later.

 

It is important to be able to have someone knowledgeable you can talk to about your dog so you are not blindsided by anything.

 

Ask About The Parents

Ask to meet the dam and sire.

 

It would be great to see how your proposed pup would turn out looking or behaving.

 

You can see anything physical that could manifest in your puppy plus you can rest assured your puppy is a pure breed if that is what you are looking for.

 

Ask about the other puppies in the litter and if they are all doing ok as well.

 

Ask how many times he breeds a year; optimally it should be once a year to let the dam rest.

 

Too many times and it can affect puppy health.

 

 

Learn More:

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Ask About The Genetics

Apart from aesthetics, your puppy can also get any pre-existing genetic diseases from their parents.

 

Good breeders can tell you what the parents had, what they have been exposed to, and probably go back some generations if the case may be.

 

This is useful to know what you may be getting into.

 

Medical procedures for adult dogs can be fairly expensive.

 

Ask About The Breeders Experience And Knowledge Of Miniature Schnauzers

It helps to not only know about the medical history but anything specific to miniature schnauzers in general.

 

Their teething, their life expectancy, any specific allergies, etc.

 

The breeders should share anything that can help you understand your dog better, help your pup grow up comfortably, registrations that are needed, or even milestones to look out for.

 

Look Out And Ask About Socialization

The earlier your puppy gets used to other dogs, puppies, humans, and a home environment, the better.

 

Your puppy can form good socialization skills being with its mother and siblings the first few weeks, and also interacting with humans.

 

It would be easier for your puppy to adapt once you take him home.

 

And the only thing you would have to worry about is your puppy getting used to its new environment and other new puppy to-do’s.

 

Seeing the puppy with the litter and its parents is also telling of so many things other than socialization.

 

Ask About The Vaccinations And De-Worming

Miniature Schnauzers Vaccination

This is very important as all puppies have to be vaccinated at specific times to avoid them catching any diseases.

 

And being able to socialize with other dogs without fear.

 

At the age you get your pup, there might still be some vaccinations to go and you need to know; your breeder should provide you with this information.

 

Ask About A Health Guarantee And Contract

Beyond just taking their word for it, the breeder should be able to give you a guarantee of the health status of the puppy.

 

If some serious ailment that should have been disclosed by the breeder is found, would they be willing to take the dog back?

 

This is outlined in the Breeder’s Contract along with other information pertaining to returns and refunds.

 

Ask When You Can Take The Puppy Home

This is usually between eight to twelve weeks.

 

If you have hope of your miniature schnauzer being a show dog, you will want certifications and paperwork on its status and health record, diet guides, etc.

 

This age range is also significant because they should have been weaned at this point.

 

Ask For A Follow-Up Contact

You may not remember all the information you get from the breeder.

 

Especially with the knowledge and experiences of raising a miniature schnauzer, so they should be available for any follow-ups.

 

If not for this, then refer anyone also looking to buy and adopt a similar breed dog.

 

Get Ready To Answer Some Questions Too

Any good breeder will be as cautious as you are when letting puppies go.

 

They would want to know your experience with dogs or puppies, why you are getting one, and if you know what you are getting into.

 

They would want to know if the puppy is going to a good home and environment.

 

These points should help you get the best out of giving a miniature schnauzer a new home.

 

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Russel

Russel

A pet owner who loves to share useful facts and information about animals. For now, I write mostly about dogs and cats.