Do Dogs Know They are Cute?

Do Dogs Know They are Cute

We are fond of our dogs so much to the point that we give them the bits and pieces of our favorite food or look for them the very moment we enter the house.

 

We love our furry pets as much as we care for our loved ones, sometimes even more so.

 

They help relieve stress when we see them rushing to meet us at the front door, wagging their tail, showering us with kisses, or jumping around us in circles.

 

They are the cutest beings there ever, and we just wish they knew that.

 

Well, not so much.

 

Dogs do not know they are cute.

 

They do not have that similar sense of self and awareness that humans do.

 

Common “Cute” Behaviors

cute dog in white background

 

Dogs just do these little common behaviors that make us just gush over how cute they are being.

Some of these behaviors are:

 

But they also make us wonder: is a dog’s cuteness innate, or is it a learned behavior?

 

 

Learn More:

Do Dogs Think Humans are Gods

 

 

Learned Behavior

Your dog, doing all these cute acts, does not intend to appear cute and lovely toward you.

 

It is all about positive reinforcement and other physiological reasons.

 

Dogs tend to smile a lot and put on a sweet expression when they want that snack or affection from you.

 

They love that you play with them, feed them, or pat them in the head, reinforcing the behavior.

 

They learn to desire a reward, whether physical like a special treat; or neurological like a dopamine hit.

 

Animals experience it, too.

 

They tilt their head not because they want to look cuter but because they want to see more clearly.

 

Dogs also observe your facial expressions, facial and body movements, your body language, and tone of your voice so that they can communicate with you better.

 

Your dog’s head tilt is not a decisive act of cuteness but an effort to see and hear better.

 

When your dog shoots you that puppy look and wistful eyes, it is not an act of cuteness and persuasion.

 

As humans, we have that preference for dogs with bigger eyes and almost a baby-like feature.

 

We tend to choose dogs with large eyes, especially when they raise their brows, signaling our brains to think they are adorable.

 

Conclusion

Dogs do not have a sense of ego, and thus they do not know they are cute.

 

Through time and repetition, they learned that by doing those “cute” behaviors, they receive love and affection from us.

 

They may not have that sense of awareness.

 

However, this is one of the many reasons why we love them and keep them close.

 

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Russel

A pet owner who loves to share useful facts and information about animals. For now, I write mostly about dogs and cats.